Philippians

The Epistle of Paul and Timothy to the Philippians, often referred to simply as Philippians, is the eleventh book in the New Testament. Paul and Timothy first visited Philippi in Greece during Paul’s second missionary journey, which occurred between approximately 49 and 51 AD. Philippi was the location of the first Christian community established in Europe.

Biblical scholars are in general agreement that the letter was indeed written by Paul of Tarsus. The estimated date of the letter is 62 AD, about 10 years after Paul’s first visit to Philippi. The historical background of Philippians is traditionally gathered from two main primary New Testament sources: informative internal data from the letter itself, and related information garnered from the rest of the New Testament Canon, especially from the Acts of the Apostles and the other Pauline Epistles. Other primary information is also derived from external historical sources related to the chronological connections between Paul’s association with Philippi, its political and economical setting, and its social and Religio-philosophical context.

According to the document itself, the Philippians had sent Epaphroditus, their envoy (“messenger [apostolon] and minister [leitourgon]” Phil 2:25), with contributions as an expression of their “partnership” and “concern” to meet the needs of Paul (Phil 1:3–5, Phil 2:30, and Phil 4:10–19).

Book of Philippians: [1] [2] [3] [4]